Category Archives: Formal fallacies in reasoning

False positive: over-zealous securities market regulation in India

Again, from the Financial Times – I’ve been reading a lot and have collected many stories in the last couple of months, but haven’t had time to write them up here – Ham-fisted crackdown sparks Indian companies’ ire: The directors … Continue reading

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False dichotomy

From Richard Fernandez: The offensive in Aleppo shows Obama has either gotten everything wrong or was dishonest to begin with. It need not be ‘either / or’. He should have written ‘and / or’, especially as the ‘and’ form of the … Continue reading

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FUM: Paul Bongiorno comes a cropper

One of the most incorrigible logical fallacies, I think, is the Fallacy of the Undistributed Middle. Together with the Fallacy of Affirming the Consequent it is the most frequently-encountered logical fallacy, and these two together with the Fallacy of Composition, I … Continue reading

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Poor reasoning – Chinese military edition

Why I care about reasoning: Senior Japanese and Chinese naval officers offered deeply contrasting views on the security situation in the Asia-Pacific region at DSEI 2015 in London. Vice Admiral Umio Otsuka, president of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force’s (JMSDF’s) Command … Continue reading

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Quelle disaster: the West’s monumental, easily-avoided and costly miscalculation in Libya

Tom Switzer, host of the ABC RadNat talkshow Between the Lines, held an interesting discussion with Alan Kuperman, Associate Professor of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin, about how the West caused the unfolding disaster in Libya. Best for you … Continue reading

Posted in Decision-making, Formal fallacies in reasoning, Informal fallacies in reasoning, Mind-sets and Logic-Bubbles, Problems with perception intuition and judgement | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Applied FAC: Gerard Henderson schools Waleed Aly

Given recent posts on the FAC, I was interested to read these paragraphs in Gerard Henderson’s Media Watch Dog of May 1: [Waleed] Aly went on to blame the executions [by the Indonesian government of convicted Australian drug smugglers Andrew … Continue reading

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Applied FAC and Logic-Bubble: ‘This ‘X’ is nuts!’

It’s quite common, I think, for all people – me included – to respond intuitively and unconsciously to behaviour that we don’t understand with the belief ‘This person/thing/behaviour/rule is nuts!’ This phrase captures the feeling that, if someone or something … Continue reading

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The Fallacy of Composition – a powerful insight into social dynamics

Last week I read an interesting piece at ‘Bloody Shovel’ discussing the Cultural Revolution in China. The author, ‘spandrell’, sought to explain how it came to be that during this period the Chinese came to worship wax mangoes, which had … Continue reading

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Slothful induction and Islamic Terrorism: questioning the ‘party line’

He claimed police and security agencies were “living on other planet”. A most appropriate comment with which to begin this post. I’ll come back to it at the end of our discussion. Before then, we have some work to do, and … Continue reading

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Slothful Induction and Islamic Terrorism – a wrap of recent events

I would like to stop writing about this topic, but it keeps bringing itself to the fore. So, here, I’ll do my best to wrap up both the most execrable examples of slothful induction with regard to islamic terrorism, and the most … Continue reading

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